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Momentum

The momentous two-month duo of March and April is over, and everything is fast becoming routine. I’ve had at least two lessons with all of my classes, and as many as five with some. I know most of my students’ names now, with only the exception of H-sho because the administrators there have been too busy to put together a name-list for me. The Kyle-store has transformed from an after-school thing with only non-club-members participating to an after-lunch thing so club-members can come, and as I only eat lunch at K-chu three days a week that allows one day for first-graders, one for second, and one for third. I’ve also expressed an interest in visiting the students’ club activities after school on Fridays, and the first of those experiences might happen as early as tomorrow, before the four-day weekend.

The most interesting experiences now are still the elementary school lessons. After the self-introduction, it was time to get right into actual teaching. As I don’t work at those schools every day and only see the homeroom teachers when I’m in the classroom, all of the planning is entirely my responsibility. I have a textbook which outlines what needs to be taught and the order in which to teach it, but how I teach it is completely up to me. It’s an interesting feeling—in contrast to the junior high school situation where the JTE does most of the teaching and I only come in once or twice a week to reinforce, I’m responsible for all of the elementary school students’ English learning for the year. The feeling of responsibility is particularly strong with the fifth-graders, as I’m laying the foundation for all of their future English learning. Things I could always count on every Japanese person to know are things these students don’t know until I teach it.

Lesson 1 was “Hello, my name is ~. What’s your name? Nice to meet you.” As much as I dislike the textbook and the CD that comes with it, I knew it would be useful in getting these structures into the students’ minds, as there’s a musical chant which sticks in your head and was very effective for teaching them. Because they don’t know phonics yet, they can’t memorize by words, so I reached all the way back to Narita training and used a technique I saw Cedric teaching to the elementary-school teachers: to draw a shape for each phrase depending on how many words. “Hello, my name is suchandsuch” is a five-point star because there are five words. “What’s your name?” is a triangle, and “Nice to meet you” is a square. The students were drawn in with curiosity as I drew the shapes, and when I pointed to each corner of the shape as the CD chanted the words, they understood immediately. Next week I opened the lesson by drawing the same shapes on the board, and the students remembered every word. The foundations of English are successfully being laid. It doesn’t get much more gratifying than that.

With the sixth-graders so far it’s just been counting and letter-games, as this year they learn numbers from 30 to 100 and the lowercase roman letters (I found out they learn uppercase in Japanese class because ‘romaji’ is one of the four writing systems they use here). I’ve been combining new ideas with some old ideas I’ve used in both JHS first-grade lessons (playing games where students have to guess ‘how many’ of something there are) and even some games I used for beginners in Germany (counting to 100 without saying multiples of a certain number, which these kids are better at than the adults were). I’ve found myself short on time a few times, but the students always have fun, and things I know I can always save what I don’t get to for following week, as I’m working with the loosest of guidelines.

One thing that will still take some getting used to is eating lunch in the classroom. It still feels a little awkward, even when I’m in lunch-groups with students who are inclined to think of questions to ask me. They think of a question (usually along the lines of “what food do you like?” or “what color do you like?”), ask me, I figure out what they’re asking, give them an answer, and that’s the end of the conversation. Occasionally I’ll remember to ask them what their favorite suchandsuch is too, but that only prolongs the conversation by a few words.

Yesterday I ate lunch with junior high school students for the first time ever, as W-sensei came up to me at with no warning at the beginning of the lunch-period and told me to come to her homeroom and eat with the students. One student was absent so I could sit at his desk. When I got there with my full tray of food, the students were just starting to get things set up so I had to wait for about ten minutes before the formal beginning of the meal was made, though unlike in elementary schools it was just a ceremonial few words instead of a whole speech. Lunch itself was just like elementary only even less social, probably because I happened to be at a table of particularly quiet students. I asked each of them what clubs or sports they were in, but that was the extent of the conversation. When I was finished with my meal I went to empty my tray, and because they’d served a curry with beef in it I’d hardly finished half of it, and when I put my tray down on the edge of the table to empty something else, it fell over and spilled curry all over the floor. So that was delightfully embarrassing, but it’s not like it was a complete disaster. If I was their age I might get made fun of for it all year, but I’m their teacher and they still respect me. I taught their class today without W-sensei (she was mysteriously absent yet again) and it went really well. They were even more respectful than when she’s present.

Regarding W-sensei, I’m afraid Enam’s warnings about her are turning out to be accurate. While she has yet to impose on me too much, it’s clear she doesn’t know how to discipline the students, and when it comes to teaching itself she’s pretty much just winging it and figuring it out as she goes along. I can’t be too hard on her because that’s been more-or-less what I’ve been doing since I started this job, but last year I noticed a distinct improvement in the first-graders’ reading ability from week to week (thanks to K-sensei and O-sensei) whereas now they seem pretty stagnant. At least it motivates me to step up my own teaching, as I don’t want them to have the disadvantage of not learning phonics at the same rate as the rest of Japanese 11-year-olds.

Outside of school, things feel like they’re picking up in the socialization department, mostly because Enam has moved in with Kim and he’s more inclined to come over and see if his neighbor wants to hang out a bit. We hung out Saturday afternoon, and Sunday evening was his birthday which we celebrated with a large group of ALTs in Chiba, starting at a bar and then migrating to the bowling alley. I got to see Stephen, Stacy, and a bunch of other people I hardly ever see, though Jack and Lily didn’t come. I’m going to try and visit them in Tokyo during the four day weekend.

But the most significant piece of news comes through a conversation I had with Enam on Saturday, about what I want to do in the future. I’ve had it in my mind since I started this that one day I’d go back to America and become a full-time teacher there. But what I learned about the present-day American education system from my own brief experience with teacher education courses as well as articles like this are a major deterrent to taking that path. Enam brought up the possibility of teaching at an international school instead, and the more we discussed it the more it made sense. I could become certified through online courses as I do the ALT thing (which certainly provides me sufficient down-time to work on assignments), then get a job as a real teacher, teaching any subject I want, anywhere in the world I want. International schools are everywhere, they pay well, and they don’t tie their teachers’ arms and legs to standardized test-scores like they’re now doing across America. I could also continue to teach in different countries around the world, but do more travelling as I’ll be better able to afford it. And I don’t think it prohibits me from returning to America either—I’m sure there must be some international schools within the United States.

So over the next few weeks I’ll be looking into online teaching certification programs and see what options are out there. What I’m doing now is the perfect springboard to what I want to do next. My life may appear somewhat aimless at times, but underlying all the shifts and changes would appear to be a steadily forward momentum.

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