Home > Personal > More Differences

More Differences

April 23rd, 2013 Leave a comment Go to comments

Last month, in my epic entry on the closing day of Togane Chu, I wrote that at the enkai K-sensei told me who the new ALT for that school was going to be, someone named Lola that I hadn’t heard of. It turns out he was talking about Laura-Anne, a girl I actually have met once before, at the beach picnic last spring with Kim and Enam. I got to meet her again this past Sunday, as Kim and Enam arranged for the four of us to go out for okonomiyaki together and get caught up. I was glad for the opportunity, as I got to ask Laura-Anne about what’s going on at my old school this year, a nice way to maintain a connection.

She’s from Jamaica (last time I’d mistakenly thought she was Indian) and came to Japan in the same group of new ALTs as Kim and Enam, at the beginning of last school year so she’s a bit newer than I am. I’m sure the students will like her, though I must confess to some relief that she’s not some super-experienced hot-shot who’ll easily out-do me. I know it’s not a competition, but my ego can’t help but want to be as many students’ favorite ALT as possible.

I also got to talk to Enam about W-sensei, as he worked with her at a different school last year. Unfortunately, what I heard was mostly negative. He agrees that she’s a really nice person, but he said she’s not that great of a teacher and is more concerned with getting the students to like her than maintaining classroom discipline. He also said she’d often try to make him do awkward things like sing songs or wear a Santa outfit at Christmas. I have no qualms about wearing a Santa costume if she’s the one who bought it, but if she asks me to sing I will decline.

I think it has to do with the fact that she was an elementary school teacher before her maternity leave, and hasn’t had enough experience with junior high school to know what works and what doesn’t. I think my working-relationship with her will be a bit different because I’ve actually been at junior high longer than her, and I’ve already established that I’m perfectly capable of planning and executing entire lessons on my own. Enam said that’s probably the way to go, but she also has a tendency to rely too heavily on the ALT and just sit back and not help at all during class, even joking around with the students while you try to give a lesson. That sounds a little frustrating, but I’d still prefer that to a JTE who never lets me do anything.

I also talked to Enam about transportation, as he also has a school that’s 10 km away and instead of getting a car, he found a good deal on an electric bicycle. I’m strongly considering doing that instead of a car because it’s far less expensive, though I still have no intention of giving up on getting the license.

As for school, I wrote that I’ll be meeting with each class at K-chu twice a week but that’s not entirely accurate. This week I only meet with each class once, and I asked S-sensei about it and she said that some weeks I’ll meet with classes more than once and some weeks I won’t. It all depends on the schedule and what’s being taught. Because it’s difficult to squeeze in two meetings with each class here due to my Wednesday and Friday mornings at other schools, I suspect weeks of just one lesson per class will be more common, something I’m a bit disappointed about.

I almost didn’t meet with any classes yesterday, as there was only one lesson scheduled—a fourth-period class with first-graders—and W-sensei was absent. S-sensei told me they would cancel the lesson but I said I was going to do the whole thing myself anyway and didn’t need W-sensei to be there. She asked the administrators and they told her the lessons should still be cancelled. I think it’s a rule that ALTs can’t give lessons without a JTE present, and while the administrators at Togane Chu had been perfectly comfortable letting me break that rule, I figured I hadn’t established enough confidence regarding my teaching abilities here yet.

But apparently there was more discussion on the matter, and at the break after first-period I was told I could go ahead and give the lesson after all. One of the vice principals and a teacher’s aide were present, but I did everything on my own and everything went perfectly well. Hopefully that will establish a firm precedent that they don’t need to cancel my English lessons when the JTE is absent. Teachers in Japan are almost never absent, but if what Enam tells me about W-sensei is true, she might be an exception. I’d hate for my already sparse teaching schedule to be made even sparser.

As for that, I definitely miss getting to do every lesson five or six times, but at least now I can use lessons or variations of lessons I did at Togane Chu that these students have never had before. Today I played the moja-moja game with the third-grade classes to practice the past-participle, and the kids were delighted. It was even better with a smaller class-size, as each student had four chances to go instead of two.

Another advantage of the smaller school and class-size is that it’s much easier to remember all of the students’ names. Keeping 600 names in my head, divided into groups of 30-35 was next to impossible, and I’d undoubtedly forget a few every week. But it took me no time at all to firmly memorize the 100-students here, as I’ve also gotten much better at memorization in general. Since memorizing their names I’ve done three classes and while I needed some hints to get through the 26-student first-grade class, I always got it after a prompt. I had the two 16-student third-grade classes today and I impressed the hell out of them by remembering every single one of their names, and I was even able to think of the name of the one student who was absent. The students are already starting to warm up to me, but that should go a long way.

But one disadvantage of the small school is that it seems every last student is in one of the clubs. I opened up the after-school “Kyle-Store” yesterday and had no participation. One girl came in to see if she could buy anything with just one dollar, and promptly left when she found out she couldn’t. I don’t think anyone is going to stay after and play games like at Togane Chu.

But I might try and check out the clubs and sports on my own. That’s something Interac encourages but at Togane Chu I gave up on it rather quickly. The students would greet me warmly and then go right on doing what they were doing while I stood there awkwardly. Only once did any of the teams invite me to play. The teams here are much smaller, so it’s worth a try to see if things here go any differently.

The only other thing worth writing about are my first actual elementary school lessons which I started on Friday at H-sho, but I’ll wait until I’ve done the rest of them tomorrow at M-sho where the reaction is sure to be different in some interesting ways.

The settling-in process continues.

Update: I just got home from school. The Kyle-store today was significantly more active than yesterday, with about two dozen students popping in to check it out, some expressing regret that they had to go to their club so couldn’t stay and play a game, and three first-grade boys did stay and play a round of Uno. We’ll see how it goes from here.

Categories: Personal Tags: , ,
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.